Cyber-Bullying

First prosecution under the the Harmful Digital Communications Act for threatening to post nude images.http://nzh.tw/11615758 

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Copyright Commissioning Rule

The Commissioning Rule is an important part of the New Zealand Copyright Act when it comes to those involved in the creative arts and industries. The rule governs who, in the absence of an agreement to the contrary, owns the relevant copyright. Regrettably it is a rule which is unknown to many and misunderstood by many others.

James Carnie of Clendons has just written a very helpful article which explains, in readily digestible form, the dos and don’ts: http://www.clendons.co.nz/resources/background-papers/copyright-and-commissioned-works/

Copyright; Commissioning, Ownership of Copyright; Intellectual Property

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Internet of Things – Wear to Now?

Looking forward to delving into recent developments in the “Internet of Things” with my co-panellists Judge David Harvey, Lloyd Gallagher, Arran Hunt, Wayne Rumbles and Nik Turner. NZLS Cyber Law Conference in May 2016 in Auckland and Wellington. For more details:

16CLC Brochure

LawTech Conference 2016

Will be discussing with colleagues from Shortland Chambers and a practitioner from private practice “technology, tools & tips in the 21st century for the legal practitioner” at the upcoming 2016 LawTech conference 0n 11 May 2016 in Auckland. For registration details: http://www.lawtechnz.com/register

 

Upcoming Flag Referendum

Our new flag flying over the summer break?

 

Dotcom Extradition 

Kim Dotcom found by District Court in Auckland to be eligible for extradition to US for alleged copyright charges http://nzh.tw/11565399
An appeal to the High Court is inevitable

The Batts Trade Mark Case

The Court of Appeal has upheld the High Court’s finding that the term “batts” had not become a common name in general public use. See http://www.nzherald.co.nz/business/news/article.cfm?c_id=3&objectid=11562097

However, it confirmed that the defendant, Knauf’s use of the word “batts” on its product packaging was not an infringement and reversed the earlier finding that use of “batts” on Knauf’s website infringed Tasman’s trade mark registration for BATTS. http://www.nzlii.org/nz/cases/NZCA/2015/602.html